Old writer on the block: About those convicts

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NEW PUBLICATION. Trial of Mudie versus Kinchela.—8vo. pp. 52. Sydney, 1840.

21 November 1840, Australasian Chronicle (Sydney, NSW : 1839 - 1843), page 2

…convict ancestors especially when the ancestors are clearly not wicked villains, and one of the convicts I want to look at was no villain. There have always been two views about the convicts. One side agreed with "Major" James Mudie who wrote The Felonry of New South Wales and was horsewhipped for it.   Mudie said all convicts were evil and would never improve. Today, people often claim that the convicts, especially their own ancestors, were "transported for stealing a loaf of bread". Mudie was neither an officer nor a gentleman, and he richly deserved his come-uppance. (For details, see 'New Publication', Australasian Chronicle, November 21, 1840, p.2 , : for a commentary (which farewells Mudie in an unfriendly way), see 'The Breakfast Table', Australasian Chronicle , January 12, 1841, p.2 ,  There appear to have been no newspaper articles that supported him.) The truth about the convicts is somewhere in the middle: some convicts were total villains, some were complete victims. In other words, there were good convicts and bad ones. There were also good and bad "free" people. Out of 245 marines (soldiers) who reached Australia, Judge-Advocate David Collins mentions four marines who received 200 lashes for manslaughter in 1788   and six marines who were…

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THE BREAKFAST TABLE. "Quousque tandem abutere Catilina, patientia nostra; quamdiuetiam furor iste tuus nos illudet? quem ad finem sese effrenata jactabit audacia; nihilne to nocturnum priesidium palatii—nihil timor populi—nihil consensus omnium bonorum commoverunt te?—CICERO.

12 January 1841, Australasian Chronicle (Sydney, NSW : 1839 - 1843), page 2

…no villain. There have always been two views about the convicts. One side agreed with "Major" James Mudie who wrote The Felonry of New South Wales and was horsewhipped for it.   Mudie said all convicts were evil and would never improve. Today, people often claim that the convicts, especially their own ancestors, were "transported for stealing a loaf of bread". Mudie was neither an officer nor a gentleman, and he richly deserved his come-uppance. (For details, see 'New Publication', Australasian Chronicle , November 21, 1840, p.2 , : for a commentary (which farewells Mudie in an unfriendly way), see 'The Breakfast Table', Australasian Chronicle, January 12, 1841, p.2 ,  There appear to have been no newspaper articles that supported him.) The truth about the convicts is somewhere in the middle: some convicts were total villains, some were complete victims. In other words, there were good convicts and bad ones. There were also good and bad "free" people. Out of 245 marines (soldiers) who reached Australia, Judge-Advocate David Collins mentions four marines who received 200 lashes for manslaughter in 1788   and six marines who were hanged for robbing the colony's food stores in 1789.   And those were the ones supposed to enforce the law! (For details of…

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JENNINGS CARMICHAEL. HER CHILDREN IN A WORKHOUSE.

16 April 1910, The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), page 4

…joy at all for older people. There was no aged pension, and an old man or woman with no family and no savings had little choice but to steal, or to go into the workhouse. There, the inmates would be fed horribly, treated worse, and exposed to all sorts of diseases. Workhouses still existed in 1904, when an Australian poet named Jennings Carmichael died after her husband deserted her. Her three sons were placed in an English workhouse until Australians found out about them in 1909, and took up a collection to pay the boys' fares back to Australia. (See  Jennings Carmichael: Her Children in a Workhouse, The Argus, April 16, 1910, p. 4 ,  and see other articles in Trove which are tagged 'Jennings Carmichael'. You will see the tag when you go to the link above: click on the tag, and at last count, 103 other articles will be listed: it seems we volunteers who do the tagging have been busy). So perhaps we should not blame the two Elizabeths too much for stealing. They may have had their reasons. The gaols of Britain were filled with deadly diseases like tuberculosis, spread by coughing and "gaol fever" (we call it typhus today) which was spread by lice. Whatever their reason, the two…